Global Flight Relief
Our LeadershipOur ToolsGlobal Flight Relief humanitarian relief efforts

OUR LEADERSHIP

Scott Terry

Founder, Chairman of the Board

As Chief Executive Officer of Tempus Jets, Terry has created a global network of aviation service organizations. Tempus has offices throughout the United States, Europe and Africa and provides flight operations, charter services, charter brokerage, aircraft sales, leasing, management, international travel support and maintenance.

A former Naval aviator, Terry has held executive positions with Merrill Lynch & Co., Flight International, Inc., and Bombardier Aerospace. Terry has an undergraduate degree in Economics and a Masters in Business Administration from Boston University. He completed a postgraduate study program in International Law with the University of London and was admitted as a Ph.D. candidate in Finance and Trade at City University Business School in London.




Robert Lake

GFR Executive Director

With a long history of aviation and humanitarian service, Bob Lake brings decades of experience to the Global Flight Relief team. From 1992-2000, he served as president of International Jet Charter, an affiliated company of the Christian Broadcasting Network that managed and flew all the company's aircraft. Previous to managing CBN, Lake spent two decades with the Delaware State Police, including 10 years in their aviation unit conducting countless medical and rescue missions.

While with CBN, Lake assisted in creating a program for mobile medical support in a large aircraft. After much research an L-1011 Tri-Star was located. The effort took for a year to transform that aircraft into "The Flying Hospital," retrofitting it so that it could accomplish medical missions worldwide. He also purchased, rebuilt, and managed three DHC-4 Caribou aircraft to be used for medical relief and the movement of supplies in Africa.

Among the missions undertaken by The Flying Hospital under Lake's leadership were those flown on behalf of Operation Smile. This effort extended to 18 countries, and The Flying Hospital facilitated surgical operations for more than 5,000 disfigured children.